sample letter of recomendation for undocumented person scholarly articles overuse in fee for service service branding articles service senter tissotesources-article-article-internal example of short magazine article for kids writing how to write the hypothesis of a research paper
Guilty of 84 Counts of Manslaughter, and No One Held Responsible
Arts, Energy, Featured Story

Guilty of 84 Counts of Manslaughter, and No One Held Responsible

Giant California Utility PG&E Kills, but It’s a Crime Without Real Punishment

Philip Mattera

A California court case seemed like a game of Catch Me If You Can this week. Justice lost.

A chief executive of Pacific Gas & Electric stood in a California courtroom and pleaded guilty to 84 counts of manslaughter in connection with a 2018 forest fire blamed on the utility’s faulty maintenance of transmission lines.

The CEO, Bill Johnson, was not personally pleading guilty to killing 84 people. He was appearing as a representative of the corporation, which was charged with the offenses and which agreed to pay the statutory maximum monetary penalty of $3.48 million. That’s around $40,000 per victim.

Since no executive of the company was charged and since a corporation cannot be put behind bars, no one is paying a real penalty in this case. That, unfortunately, is the norm for almost all matters of corporate misconduct.

Since no executive of the company was charged and since a corporation cannot be put behind bars, no one is paying a real penalty in this case.

Usually, however, a hefty monetary penalty takes the place of imprisonment. PG&E is not even facing that limited form of punishment to a meaningful degree in the immediate case. It was separately pressured to create a $13 billion fund to compensate victims of the Camp Fire.

It is difficult to see the PG&E case as anything more than a symbolic gesture. It leaves open the question of what would be an appropriate way to deal with egregious corporate misconduct.

Governor’s Gambit

Bill Johnson, chief executive officer and president of PG&E Corp., standing right, lowers his head after admitting the company’s guilt in the deaths of 84 people in a 2018 wildfire. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, Pool),

For a while, it appeared that the utility might face serious consequences after Gov. Gavin Newsom raised the possibility of a state takeover. It now appears Newsom was simply using that threat as leverage to get PG&E to make some changes to its operations. Those changes are unlikely to be adequate for a company with such a poor track record.

Converting PG&E from an investor-owned utility into a customer-owned cooperative, as some California officials suggested, would accomplish much more. Skimping on maintenance to bolster quarterly profits would likely become a thing of the past under such an arrangement.

Such a conversion would in effect be a death penalty for the existing PG&E. But instead of putting the company out of business, it would resurrect it in a new, more accountable form.

Plenty of Precedents

This is actually not a very radical idea. There are already many community-owned utilities across the United States. They even have their own trade association, the American Public Power Association. There are also many cooperative utilities. Even the federal government is involved through entities such as the Tennessee Valley Authority.

Yet these forms of public power have never represented more than a slice of the industry, which instead has been dominated by large investor-owned utilities whose clout was supposed to be kept in check by strict regulatory oversight, especially at the state level.

PG&E is a prime example of the failure of that oversight. Perhaps it is time to return to the idea of regarding access to energy, like health care, as a right rather than a product.

Featured image: A motorist watches flames from a wildfire in December 2017. Hundreds of homes were destroyed in California. (Noah Berger/AP)

June 20, 2020