Author: Terry Schwadron

Terry H. Schwadron retired as a senior editor at The New York Times, Deputy Managing Editor at The Los Angeles Times and leadership jobs at The Providence (RI) Journal-Bulletin. He was part of a Pulitzer Gold Medal team in Los Angeles, and his team part of several Pulitzers in New York. As an editor, Terry created new approaches in newsrooms, built technological tools and digital media. He pursued efforts to recruit and train minority journalists and in scholarship programs. A resident of Harlem, he volunteers in community storytelling, arts in education programs, tutoring and is an active freelance trombone player.

OKing the Texas Vigilante Law Declares Open Season on Abortion; Get Ready for What Comes Next Caveats aside, the effect of the Supreme Court’s decision to gut abortion in Texas will go far beyond women’s health decisions. We should stop and shudder about the consequences for state-sanctioned intimidation by bullies who don’t like your decisions – something that did not seem to concern our esteemed Supreme Court justices one bit. That law SCOTUS just permitted to take effect in a hurry-up midnight decision lets private citizens – vigilantes by any other name – intimidate anyone aiding an abortion. They can…

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Texas Grants Anyone on the Street the Power to Block Abortions, and the Supreme Court Ducks the Matter Altogether So, the new aggressive and restrictive Texas abortion law, one that encourages vigilantism to stop abortions, kicked in on Sept. 1 with no one at the Supreme Court deciding to enforce current federal law. The Texas law, which makes abortions illegal six weeks after conception (how would anyone know?), actually offers any private citizen a $10,000 bounty for catching and successfully suing someone aiding or abetting abortion. As I get it, this law pushes the boundaries of anti-abortion activism substantially, not…

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Yes, the Speaker Got the First Votes She Needed on Biden’s Giant Infrastructure Plan, But It’s Far from a Done Deal The preliminary win to advance President Biden’s huge social services spending bill is being depicted as a parliamentary victory for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi over a small group of would-be Democratic spoilers. A day or more later, what looks more likely: While the specifics did show Pelosi’s legislative skill, the important, if narrow, victory here is for an aggressive agenda to help a lot of people – despite unanimous objection from Republicans. There is way too much focus on…

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A Case of Cognitive Dissonance: Are the Endangered Afghans Friends in Need or Infectious Islamic Invaders? For a few moments, I wondered if the Republican opposition, which is so reveling in the discomfort that Joe Biden’s decision-making on Afghanistan has evoked, actually was expressing  concern about the fate of myriad Afghans who helped the American and coalition cause. Naturally, a certain hypocrisy in messaging from the Right took only another day to kick in. The heart-breaking images of those who helped repel terrorism in Afghanistan for 20 years realistically reflect the near impossibility of removing the anti-terrorists in large…

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Who to Blame? Bush, Who Walked Away? Obama, Who Dithered? Trump, Who Made the Deal? Or Biden, Who Closed It? And now, with the inevitable, but quickened, collapse of Afghanistan comes the blame game and the need to use national embarrassment for political gain. Call it mistaken national pride or a constant need for a fall guy, Americans always seem to need to personify their collective distaste, particularly if the messages along the way never fully matched the reality. We see it all the time: When the baseball team drops out of contention, people call to fire the manager. When…

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